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dc.contributorSarzynski, Sarah
dc.contributor.advisorGudmundson, Lowell
dc.contributor.authorTrout, Kaitlyn
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-11T17:44:56Z
dc.date.available2012-05-11T17:44:56Z
dc.date.issued2012-05-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10166/998
dc.description.abstractThe Cajuns are a cultural group that lives almost exclusively in Southwest Louisiana. Today they are portrayed in mainstream media through reality television shows and cook books, but how did this 'Cajun fever' emerge? This paper travels through three generations of oral history accounts and attempts to explain how externally- driven processes of commodification of language, foodways, and Mardi Gras created a new, if fictitious, culture. It explores the ways in which Cajuns have had to choose between their own authentic culture and a commodified, yet profitable version of it.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipLatin American Studiesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectCajunen_US
dc.subjectLouisianaen_US
dc.subjectCommodificationen_US
dc.subjectoral historyen_US
dc.subjectmemory studiesen_US
dc.subjectlanguageen_US
dc.subjectfoodwaysen_US
dc.subjectMardi Grasen_US
dc.subjectisolationen_US
dc.subject"English Only"en_US
dc.subjectSwamp Toursen_US
dc.titleThe Marketable Swamp People: The Effects of Commodification on Louisiana’s Cajun Cultureen_US
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.gradyear2012en_US
mhc.institutionMount Holyoke College
mhc.degreeUndergraduateen_US
dc.rights.restrictedpublic


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