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dc.contributor.authorRahman, Kaussar
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-22T13:29:56Z
dc.date.available2019-04-22T13:29:56Z
dc.date.created2017-10-20
dc.date.issued2019-04-22
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10166/5647
dc.description.abstractDuring my internship, I worked with the Ghana National Education Campaign Coalition (GNECC), a network of civil society organizations that invest in promoting quality basic education for all students. During my time at GNECC, I learned how the privatization of education influences the quality, affordability, and access of basic education for all students. Within a few years, the privatization of education in Ghana has increased rapidly. Private companies worldwide are coming into Ghana, establishing private schools in rural areas and prompting parents to pay low school fees. This is a good initiative; however, the ways in which these companies operate the schools is poor. In addition, the intentions of these companies are to make profit from improvised communities who can’t afford governmental-based school fees. In my presentation, I will focus on the Omega School Franchise, which is a private company that promised to invest in building quality and affordable schools in rural areas. However, their main motive is to make profit from impoverished communities. Are these private companies doing more harm than good? While at GNECC, I learned how to navigate my voice and opinions in a large crowd and with that I have developed better leadership skills that I will carry on outside the gates of Mount Holyoke College.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.titleThe Privatization of Education in Ghana: the Case of Omega School Franchise
dc.title.alternative4 Continents, 33 Countries, 5 Non-Profit Organizations, 1 Lynk
dc.rights.restrictedpublic
dc.description.panabstractNavigating nonprofits from different organizational perspectives, our summer experiences involved engagement with both local and global missions. While one panel member aided families in the transition from unsafe living conditions to sustainable housing in North Carolina, another panelist in New York provided legal services to LGBTQ and HIV-positive individuals. From Washington DC, our third panelist used digital media to raise awareness about human rights violations in South Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. Our fourth panel member helped create policies that advocate for quality education inclusive to all students in Ghana. Our final panelist in Boston contributed to research to further resettlement efforts for refugees overseas. The non-profit organizations where we worked spanned the globe; the projects we pursued were as diverse as the communities with which we engaged.


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