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dc.contributorMarkovits, Elizabeth
dc.contributorRodgers, Amy
dc.contributor.advisorBlaetz, Robin
dc.contributor.authorHarkins, Chloe
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-02T15:36:03Z
dc.date.available2018-07-02T15:36:03Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10166/4663
dc.description.abstractThere is a lengthy history of teenagers on television, and of teenagers as a television viewing audience. Over the past decade, developments in how technology allows audiences to interact with television have affected both the structure and content of television that features and caters to teenagers. Using specific texts (most notably Gossip Girl (The CW, 2007-2012), Riverdale (The CW, 2017-), and Heathers (Paramount, 2017)) and the paratexts formed by audience members in their interaction online with the original texts and their creators, this thesis seeks to understand how teen television has adapted itself to fit the models created by the internet and its users and the nature of its potential repercussions for the genre and for television in general.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFilm Studiesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjecttelevisionen_US
dc.subjectaudience interactionen_US
dc.subjectteen televisionen_US
dc.subjectsocial mediaen_US
dc.subjectGossip Girlen_US
dc.subjectRiverdaleen_US
dc.subjectHeathersen_US
dc.title“Sardonic Humor is My Way of Relating to the World”: Audience Interaction With Teen Television, 2007 - Presenten_US
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.gradyear2018en_US
mhc.institutionMount Holyoke College
mhc.degreeUndergraduateen_US
dc.rights.restrictedpublicen_US


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