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dc.contributor.authorAli-Mason, Nialena (Nia) T.
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-27T19:24:04Z
dc.date.available2018-03-27T19:24:04Z
dc.date.created2016-10-21
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10166/4583
dc.description.abstractThe The Alternatives to Violence Project (AVP) was founded by Quakers and the models of their workshops are used across the globe in a variety of places including war-torn areas, red light districts and shelters for people with HIV. Due to the high rates of incarceration in the U.S. and the violent nature of prisons, AVP mostly works inside of prisons in the U.S. As an AVP intern I participated in workshops inside of correctional facilities throughout Massachusetts teaching non-violence strategies to inmates from all backgrounds. Many of the strategies and teaching tools used in the workshops focused on recognizing past traumas, unpacking childhoods, building community and finding inner peace. As an International Relations & Africana Studies major, this internship allowed me to engage with much of the material that I would discuss in my classes in a new way. I was able to see the material impacts of mass incarceration and make a difference in incarcerated citizens lives (which in turn benefits the families and communities that they will be returning to). The Alternatives to Violence Project increased my passion for justice, exposed me to other realities and made me more able to collaborate and effect change in different settings.
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.titleFinding Peace in Prisons: An Inside Outside Project
dc.title.alternativeBalancing Human Bonds and Professional Realities
dc.rights.restrictedpublic
dc.description.panabstractThis panel will bring light to the challenges and rewards of working closely with a community-based organization. Over the summer we interned for a variety of organizations in the New England area that are committed to social justice and advocacy. These organizations offered educational, mental health, and emotional support to marginalized groups including LGBTQ youth, incarcerated men, psychiatric patients, and young mothers. Though our internships varied in the types of services offered and populations that they supported, each organization emphasized the importance of helping people develop skills to uplift themselves and others through peer support and group empowerment. In various ways, we all encountered the challenges of navigating close-knit community spaces as an outsider, engaging people on an emotional level while maintaining professional boundaries. We invite you to join us as we talk about our journeys navigating community spaces, balancing human bonds and adhering to professional realities.


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