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dc.contributorMorgan, Lynnen_US
dc.contributorGudmundson, Lowellen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRoth, Joshuaen_US
dc.contributor.authorAoyama, Shanaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-02-16T13:47:21Z
dc.date.available2011-02-16T13:47:21Z
dc.date.issued2011-02-16
dc.date.submitted2007-05-23 15:33:33en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10166/736
dc.description.abstractTransnational migration has led to a situation in which humans can no longer form an identity based on location. The nikkei of Peru, or Japanese immigrants and their descendents, are an example of this circumstance. Anthropology has come a long way since the study of primitive communities and has transformed due to social, economic, and political changes. Through interviews, historical research, and observation, I explore the ways in which the nikkei are an unusual population that transcends the typical markers of identity to create their own unique form of identification.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipAnthropologyen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectNikkeien_US
dc.subjectPeruen_US
dc.subjectanthropologyen_US
dc.subjectinterneten_US
dc.subjectethnographyen_US
dc.subjectidentityen_US
dc.titleNikkei-ness: A Cyber-Ethnographic Exploration of Identity Among the Japanese Peruvians of Peruen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.date.gradyear2007en_US
mhc.institutionMount Holyoke Collegeen_US
mhc.degreeUndergraduateen_US
dc.rights.restrictedpublic


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