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dc.contributorJoralemon, Donald
dc.contributorLass, Andrew
dc.contributorTownsley, Eleanor
dc.contributor.advisorMorgan, Lynn
dc.contributor.authorHarwood, Catherine
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-31T20:23:30Z
dc.date.available2016-08-31T20:23:30Z
dc.date.issued2016-08-31
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10166/3932
dc.description.abstractCerebral palsy (CP) is the most common physical disability among children, yet little is understood about this disability throughout the lifespan, from childhood into adulthood. Young adults with CP are facing unprecedented challenges finding appropriate medical care. There is a push to transition adults with CP out of the pediatric medical system, while adult-focused practitioners often lack the experience to properly treat patients with complex childhood conditions such as CP. These barriers to accessing suitable medical care are important because, without adequate treatment, it is difficult for people with CP to participate in the social rights granted through legislation like the Americans with Disabilities Act. This study explores how the needs of people with CP and other childhood onset disabilities are represented in American medical practices and society at large.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSociology & Anthropologyen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectanthropologyen_US
dc.subjectdisability studiesen_US
dc.subjectculture, health, and scienceen_US
dc.subjectcerebral palsyen_US
dc.subjectethnographyen_US
dc.titleUnheard Voices: An Ethnographic Study of Childhood Onset Disability, Cerebral Palsy, Society, and Medicineen_US
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.gradyear2016en_US
mhc.institutionMount Holyoke College
mhc.degreeUndergraduateen_US
dc.rights.restrictedrestricteden_US


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