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dc.contributorSchwartz, Robert
dc.contributorKlarich, Elizabeth
dc.contributorMcGinness, Frederick
dc.contributor.advisorGilsdorf, Sean
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Chelsea
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-01T13:34:47Z
dc.date.available2014-07-01T13:34:47Z
dc.date.issued2014-07-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10166/3574
dc.description.abstractThe expansion of the early Islamic Empire has long been associated with the Fall of the West and the End of Antiquity. In fact, in his thesis, Henri Pirenne argued in 1939 that the seventh-century Islamic conquests solidified the End of Antiquity and decimated the Mediterranean economy. I argue that Pirenne’s thesis was incomplete. First, the drastic changes which occurred in the post-Roman Mediterranean world took hold long before the Islamic state expanded through the Mediterranean and Asia Minor and had various causes, such as plague, natural disaster, and social transformations. Second, the expansion and consolidating reforms enacted under the Umayyad and subsequent caliphates provided opportunities for new economic and communication networks to evolve and contribute to a new Mediterranean world-system.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipHistoryen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectmedieval historyen_US
dc.subjecthistoryen_US
dc.subjectPirenneen_US
dc.subjectIslamic Empireen_US
dc.subjectMediterraneanen_US
dc.subjecthistoriographyen_US
dc.subjectarchaeologyen_US
dc.subjecteconomic historyen_US
dc.subjectsocial historyen_US
dc.subjectimperialismen_US
dc.subjectempireen_US
dc.titleConquest, Empire, Impact, and Context: The Early Islamic Empire in a Medieval World Systemen_US
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.gradyear2014en_US
mhc.institutionMount Holyoke College
mhc.degreeUndergraduateen_US
dc.rights.restrictedpublicen_US


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